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​​​​​Sixth Form

Students entering the Sixth Form to study AS and A2 subjects are required to have a minimum of five I/GCSE grades A* to C. It is recommended that students should have a grade 'B' at I/GCSE in any subject they wish to study at AS level although every case will be looked at on its merits and students should ensure they are aware of the specific subject requirements for their desired courses.
It is recommended that students achieve at least a grade 'C' at AS Level in any subject that they wish to carry on to A2 level.

Any student who does not pass the AS exams in a specific subject at the end of the Lower 6th will not, unless there are exceptional circumstances, be allowed to continue with that subject to A2.

​Subjects

​Mathematics (WJEC)

Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course students should have a grade B or A in IGCSE mathematics, grade A at WJEC mathematics or a grade 1 at CXC mathematics.
 
Overview:
The two year course provides students with a thorough grounding in pure mathematics, mechanics and/or statistics which would support university applications not only for maths related subjects but also for engineering, science, and business studies courses.
Unit descriptors:

Pure Mathematics 1 (C1)
In this course students study indices, surds, quadratics, graphs of functions, coordinate geometry, polynomials, binomial expansion and differentiation.

Pure Mathematics 2 (C2)
In this course students study sequences including arithmetic and geometric sequences, logarithms, coordinate geometry of the circle, trigonometry and integration.

Pure Mathematics3 (C3)
In this course students extend their knowledge of trigonometry covering knowledge of the  secant, cosecant and cotangent and of sin-1, cos-1 and tan-1 functions. They also cover numerical solution of equations, Simpson’s rule, differentiation of functions defined implicitly or parametrically and integration of ex, sinx, cosx and x-1.

Pure Mathematics4 (C4)
In this course the topics covered are: binomial for rational exponents, partial fractions, compound angle trigonometric identities, cartesian and parametric equations of curves, simple differential equations, volumes of revolution, integration by parts and vectors.

Mechanics paper 1(M1)
Rectilinear motion, Newton’s Laws of motion, friction, momentum and impulse and statics are the modules covered in this course.

Statistics paper 1(S1)
In this course students study conditional probability, multiplication laws for dependent and independent events, exhaustive events and Bayes’ Theorem. They also study discrete probability distributions, the binomial and Poisson distributions and continuous probability distributions.

Assessment:​
In May/June year 12 students sit C1, C2 and S1 and year 13 students sit C3, C4 and M1.


English Literature (CIE)

Entry Requirements

In order to be considered for entry to this course students should have at least grade B in English and English Literature or level 2 in CXC English Language or Literature.

Why Study English?
Studying English Literature at A Level gives students who enjoy reading the opportunity to read widely across a range of literary genres, time periods and authors. It encourages them to develop both analytical and creative responses to the texts they read, as well as to explore the contexts in which the texts were written. Studying English Literature at A Level provides students with an excellent foundation for a number of University Degree courses by promoting essential skills such as: effective communication in speech and writing; essay writing; research; time management; organisation and working independently as well as in groups.

AS LEVEL:
Paper 3: Poetry and Prose
2 hour exam (closed book): 50% of AS level; 25% of A2
For this paper, students will study the poetry of Elizabeth Jennings and The Namesake by Jumpha Lahiri. In the exam, they will answer one essay question on each text.
Paper 4: Drama
2 hour exam (closed book): 50% of AS level; 25% of A2
Students answer one essay question on each of the following two plays: Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn and Philadelphia Here I Come by Brian Friel.

A2 LEVEL:
Paper 5: Shakespeare and other pre-20th Century Texts
2 hour exam (closed book) – 25% of A2
Students study Measure for Measure or Othello by William Shakespeare and another pre-20th Century text: Emma by Jane Austen, Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte or The Franklin’s Prologue and Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer. They answer one essay question on each text in the exam.​
Paper 6: 1900 to the Present​
2 hour exam (closed book): 25% of A2
Students will answer two essay questions, one each on the following texts: The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga and Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller.​

Biology

Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students should have at least a grade B in IGCSE Biology, a grade 1 in CXC Biology, or at least a AB in the double award science with strong performance in the Biology component.

Overview:
This course aims to stimulate a sustained interest in biology through investigative work both in the laboratories and outside the classroom. The applications of biology in the modern world is a large content of the course and this fosters an understanding in students of how the study and practice of biology is affected by social, economic, technological, ethical and cultural factors and also how these theories and methods have developed over time . A-level students are taught in fully equipped laboratories and are expected to use and become proficient with all the subject specific apparatus and IT equipment available.
 
Course content:
Main Course                                                       Applications
 
Cell Structure                                                 Biodiversity and Conservation
Enzymes                                                        Biotechnology
Cell Membranes and Transport                     Aspects of Human Reproduction
Biological Molecules                                      Crop Plants
Cell and Nuclear Division                               Gene Technology
Genetic Control
Transport
Gas Exchange
Infectious Diseases
Immunity
Ecology
Energy and Respiration
Photosynthesis
Regulation and Control
Inherited Change
Selection and Evolution

Chemistry

Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students should have at least a grade B in IGCSE Chemistry, a grade 1 in CXC Chemistry, or at least a AB in the double award science with strong performance in the chemistry component.
 
Overview:
With less emphasis on factual material, the Chemistry course focuses on understanding and application of scientific concepts and principles. The course aims to provide, through well-designed studies of experimental and practical chemistry, a worthwhile educational experience for all students, whether or not they go on to study beyond pre-university level.
 
Course Content:
  • Section 1: Inorganic Chemistry
  • Section 2: Physical Chemistry
  • Section 3: Organic Chemistry
  • Section 4a: The Chemistry of Life
  • Section 4b: Design and Materials
 
Assessment:
Students follow a staged assessment route by taking the Advanced Subsidiary (AS) qualification in the first year. At this stage students write three external examinations (Papers 1, 2 and 3). Subject to satisfactory performance in the AS examinations, students pursue a further year`s study (A2) leading to a full A Level. At the end of the second year students write two external examinations (Papers 4 and 5).
  • Paper 1: Multiple-choice
  • Paper 2: AS structured questions
  • Paper 3: Advanced Practical Skills
  • Paper 4: A2 structured questions
  • Paper 5: Planning, Analysis and Evaluation

Marine Science

Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students should have at least at a grade C in IGCSE Biology, a grade 1 or 2 in CXC Biology, or at least a BB in the double award science.  GCSE Geography is also strongly recommended.
 
Overview:
This course aims to stimulate and foster an interest in marine biology in both the local and global context. Our students have a great advantage in Cayman as much of the course can be delivered through practical observation and investigations. Wherever appropriate, snorkeling, diving and kayaking trips are used to support the curriculum and local scientists from both the Department of the Environment and REEF are used to give students first hand access to data and field techniques. The course develops an understanding of the need for cooperation between individuals, groups and countries and that science and the language of it, transcends national boundaries. Our A-level students are taught in fully equipped laboratories and are expected to use and become proficient with all the subject specific apparatus and IT equipment available.

Course Content:
  • Section 1: Scientific method
  • Section 2: Marine ecosystems and biodiversity
  • Section 3: Energetics of marine ecosystems
  • Section 4: Nutrient cycles in marine ecosystems
  • Section 5: Coral reefs and lagoons
  • Section 6: The ocean floor and the coast
  • Section 7: Physical and chemical oceanography
  • Section 8: Physiology of marine primary producers
  • Section 9: Aspects of marine animal physiology
  • Section 10: Marine animal reproductive behaviour
  • Section 12: Aquaculture
  • Section 13: Human impact on marine ecosystems
  • Section 14: Marine conservation and ecotourism
  • Section 15: Marine biotechnology

Assessment:​
Pupils write two externally set exams at the end of the first year (papers 1 and 2) and a further two at the end of the second year (papers 3 and 4).

  • Paper 1: Structured Questions                                                        
  • Paper 2: Data-handling and Long Answer Questions
  • Paper 3: Structured Questions                                                     
  • Paper 4: Data-handling and Long Answer Questions​

Physics

Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students should have at least a grade B in IGCSE Physics, a grade 1 in CXC Physics, or at least a AB in the double award science with strong performance in the physics component.  If a student wishes to study a physics related subject at university it is recommended that mathematics is also chosen.

Overview:
The A-level Physics course aims to provide pupils with sufficient knowledge and understanding in physics to become confident citizens in a technological world and to encourage pupils to take an informed interest in matters of scientific import. Practical work features heavily throughout the course, allowing pupils to develop a range of practical skills and a concern for accuracy, precision and reliability. Students are taught in fully equipped laboratories and are expected to use and become proficient with all the subject specific apparatus and IT equipment available.
 
Course Content:
  • Section 1: General Physics
  • Section 2: Newtonian Mechanics
  • Section 3: Matter
  • Section 4: Oscillations and Waves
  • Section 5: Electricity and Magnetism
  • Section 6: Modern Physics
  • Section 7: Gathering and Communicating Information
Assessment:
Pupils write three externally set exams at the end of the first year (papers 1, 2 and 3) and two more at the end of the second year (papers 4 and 5).
  • Paper 1: Multiple-choice                                                    
  • Paper 2: Structured Questions
  • Paper 3: Advanced Practical Skills
  • Paper 4: Structured Questions
  • Paper 5: Planning, Analysis and Evaluation

Business Studies

Entry:​
Students who have previously studied the subject at GCSE/ CXC and attained a B/level 2 or higher will be given preference. Students who have not studied the subject before are also welcome to apply. In order to be considered for entry to this course students should have at least an IGCSE grade B or CXC 2 in English Language and IGCSE grade B or CXC 2 in Mathematics.
 
Overview:
A Level Business Studies is accepted by universities and employers all over the world as proof of essential knowledge and entrepreneurial ability. The wide-ranging nature of the course encourages hard-working students to follow a variety of career paths in business, law, tourism, sport and entertainment amongst others. .
 
The Business Studies syllabus enables candidates to understand and appreciate the nature and scope of business, and the role business plays in society.
 
The syllabus covers economic, environmental, ethical, governmental, legal, social and technological issues, and encourages a critical understanding of organisations, the markets they serve and the process of adding value. Candidates examine the management of organisations and, in particular, the process of decision-making in the context of a dynamic external environment.
 
Course Content:
  • Business and its environment 
  • People in organisations
  • Marketing
  • Operations and project management
  • Finance & accounting
  • Strategic management
 Assessment:
  • At the end of Year 12, students will sit two papers (both 1 hour 15 minutes in length) based on short answer, data response and a choice of essay questions.
  • At the end of Year 13, students sit one paper (three hours in length) based on data response and a choice of essay questions.
  • The Year 12 papers make up 100% of the AS level grade and 50% of the overall two year
  • A2 grade.​

Economics

Entry                                                                                    
In order to be considered for entry to this course students should have at least an IGCSE grade B or CXC 2 in English Language and IGCSE grade B or CXC 2 in Mathematics. No previous subject knowledge is required but preference will be given to students with previous exam knowledge.
 
Overview
Success in Cambridge International A Level & AS Level Economics is accepted by universities and employers as proof of essential knowledge and ability. Successful Cambridge International A & AS Level candidates gain lifelong skills, including:
the ability to explain and analyse economic issues and arguments
the ability to evaluate economic information and organise, present and communicate ideas and judgements clearly
a sound foundation of economic ideas including an introduction to the price system and government intervention, international trade and exchange rates, the measurement of employment and inflation and the causes and consequences of inflation.
 
Course content
  • Basic economic ideas
  • Theory of the firm and the price system
  • Government Intervention
  • International trade
  • Theory and Measurement in the Economy
  • Macroeconomic problems and policies
 
Assessment
At the end of year 12 and 13, students will sit 2 written papers.  Paper 1 is a multiple choice paper and Paper 2 includes a compulsory data response and a choice of essay questions.Year 12 makes up 100% of the AS grade and 50% of the full 2 year A2 course.

Travel & Tourism

Entry:
Students who have previously studied the subject at GCSE/ CXC and attained a C grade or higher will be given preference.  Students who have not studied the subject before are welcome to apply. In order to be considered for entry to this course students should have at least an IGCSE grade B or CXC 2 in English Language and IGCSE grade B or CXC 2 in Mathematics.

Overview:
Travel and Tourism is an exciting course that is the only one of its kind at A-Level in the Cayman Islands. Travel and Tourism is all around us in the Cayman Islands and the industry offers a plethora of jobs and career opportunities that suits all kinds of personalities. You could become the CEO of a hotel chain, a top chef or an entrepreneur with your own tourist business! The course is examined by the University of Cambridge with a focus on International issues and tourism.
 
The Travel and Tourism A-Level course encourages students to appreciate the scale and importance of the travel and tourism industry in the world and recognise the positive and negative impacts the industry may have on people, environments and economies. Students will learn that the travel and tourism industry is dynamic in nature and how the industry responds to change. This course provides an opportunity to explore what our island has to offer and see first-hand how businesses run. You will build relationships with companies and workers here on island in the Travel and Tourism industry as a lot of the learning will be through visits to local businesses and taking part in day trips.
 
This course encourages candidates to learn practical and technical skills relevant to the industry, enabling them to deal with a range of complex situations and problems that will help prepare them for the world of work and become an extremely employable person.
 
Examples of topic areas: International travel, customer service, eco-tourism, cultural tourism, learn about destinations, adventure tourism, the structure of the travel and tourism industry, which business operate in the industry and what role they play and much more! 
 
Assessment:
In the first year of the course (AS) students complete one piece of coursework and one examination paper. The coursework project which involves planning, managing and carrying out a real travel and tourism event as a team. They work as a team but present their information separately. Previous examples include an a two day Eco Adventure to the East End and a Domestic cultural and activity weekend trip to Cayman Brac.In the second year (A2) students complete 2 examination papers of equal weighting​

Art & Design

Art and Design is a mode of expression and communication. It is concerned with visual perception and aesthetic experience. The Art and Design syllabus is designed for those students who wish to extend and develop their studies in this subject. Most of the work is practical and students will develop skills of observation and analysis combined with personal expression, imagination and an appreciation of practical design problems. Creativity and originality are equally important within a students work.

Entry
In order to be considered for entry to this course students should have a minimum of grade B at IGCSE/ GCSE or a level 2 pass at CXC.  Students may be asked to show a portfolio of artwork for the teacher to view. This can be examination artwork.
 
Assessment
  • AS level comprise 2 components
  • Component 1   Controlled test
  • Component 2   Coursework
A-level comprises 4 components
  • The above 2 components.
  • Component 3    Coursework
  • Component 4    Related study
 
Areas of study offered
  • Painting and Related Media​


​Music

A level music is for students who are already aiming to develop performance on their instrument to a high standard and are probably having private instruction on their instrument outside of school. The practical element of the exam is worth 30%.   Students should also enjoy composition and the creative freedom it allows. They need to feel comfortable notating their ideas onto paper or via computer software.  Composition is also worth 30% of the final examination.  

Entry
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students should play a musical instrument to Trinity (or equivalent) Grade 5 and above, and be able to read music. Students who have studied music at GCSE would be at an advantage; however this is not a prerequisite.

Overview
Students will be required to learn and perform 2 to 3 pieces of appropriate standard for their final assessment at the end of each year. (Trinity grade 6 and above)
 
Students will compose and submit 2 compositions of approximately 3 mins each for their final assessment at the end of each year.
 
The listening paper requires students to study a number of set works in some detail ranging in styles from Beethoven to Queen to Glenn Miller in their 1st year, in the second year they focus on one 20th century set work.  In addition they will cover the Baroque, Classical and Romantic composers in their 1st Year, and the 20th century composers in their 2nd year.​

Geography


“Geography illuminates the past, explains the present and prepares us for the future.  What could be more important than that?” Michael Palin

Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course students should have at least B or above at IGCSE or a level 2 or above at CXC. If a student has not studied Geography, strong overall grades are required.
 
Overview:
The Geography course brings the world into the classroom with interactive lessons and exciting learning opportunities. The course highlights the fast pace of a changing world, and gives every student the chance to really investigate the current themes and issues affecting the planet. The syllabus inspires pupils to think about their own place in the world, their values and responsibilities to other people, to the environment and to the sustainability of the planet.

Course content:
  • AS Level: Hydrology and Fluvial Geomorphology, Atmosphere and Weather, Rocks and Weathering, Population, Migration and Settlement Dynamics.
  • A2 Level: Choose two physical and two human geography options. The physical options include: Tropical Environments, Coastal Environments, Hazardous Environments and Hot Arid and Semi-Arid Environments. The human options include: Production, Location and Change, Environmental Management, Global Interdependence and Economic Transition.
Assessment:
  • At AS Level there will be an assessment of 6 topics in two exams. Paper 1 includes three physical topics. Paper 2 includes three human topics. Both exams are 1 hour and 30 minutes in length.
  • At A2 Level there will be an assessment of 4 topics in two exams. Paper 3 includes two physical topics. Paper 4 includes two human topics. Both exams are 1 hour and 30 minutes in length.​

History

Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students should have at least B or above at IGCSE or a level 2 or above at CXC.

Overview:
The course at A/S is concerned mainly with European History; the French Revolution, Nationalism in 19th century Europe, the Russian Revolution and the rise of totalitarianism (Mussolini, Hitler and Stalin). At A2, the students get a world perspective by studying the Cold War and events in the second half of the 19th century. Knowledge of the basic historical facts is of course necessary; however, a successful student of History must also read very widely to be able to put events in perspective and to use evidence to challenge the various opinions of historians. All this requires critical thinking skills and the ability to write analytically.

Course Content:
  • AS Level: International Relations, 1871–1945.
  • A2 Level: The History of the USA, 1945-1990 and The Holocaust.
 
Assessment:
  • At AS Level there will be an assessment in two exam papers. Paper 1 is a sourced based exam assessing The Search for International Peace and Security, 1919–1945. This paper is 1 hour in length. Paper 2 is based on student understanding of the course content and is 1 hour and 30 minutes in length. Pupils will be able to select questions from two out of the three key topics studied.
  • At A2 Level there will be an assessment of 2 topics in two exam papers. Paper 3 is a historiography based exam assessing student understanding of the history of The Holocaust and is 1 hour in length. Paper 4  is a depth study of The History of the USA, 1945–1990 and is a 1 hour 30 minutes in length.  It focus on the political, social and economic history of this period.

Information Technology


Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students must have previously completed a Cambridge IGCSE course, or the equivalent, in Information and Communication Technology or in Computer Science.
 
Overview:
This syllabus encourages learners to become effective and discerning users of IT. It helps them to develop a broad range of IT skills, knowledge and understanding. Learners study the structure and use of IT systems within a wide range of organisations, including the use of a variety of computer networks. As a result, learners gain an understanding of IT system life cycles, and how these affect the workplace. They also learn about the wider impact of IT on society in general. At A Level, learners also study simple programming for the web relevant to their own use of IT.
 
Assessment:
At the end of each year students sit a written examination and a practical skills examination.
  • Paper 1 - Theory and Paper 3 - Advanced Theory are 1 hour 45 minutes each. The number of marks for each paper is 90 marks.
  • Paper 2 - Practical and Paper 4 - Advanced Practical are 2 hours 30 minutes each. The number of marks for each paper is 110 marks.
 
Comments from Year 12 students:
“Taking the IT course is going to be SUPER beneficial to any student because the future consists of computers. Though it may be challenging, it would probably be more useful than most other subjects in this day and age.”
 
"IT is a very useful subject to have and it never ceases to challenge you, but the teachers are always willing to give you one on one assistance, as well as your classmates who have previously done ICT at IGCSE."
 
“IT is very useful but challenging course which will benefit your computer skills in any career path you decide to pursue.”
 
“If you were strong in ICT at IGCSE, it’s definitely a good course to take at A-level as it balances out other intense subjects, as well as providing the knowledge needed to succeed in today’s technological age.”​


Psychology

Overview:
The Psychology course is both challenging and thoroughly interesting.  The course focuses on the historical aspects of psychology as well as the development and uses of psychological concepts.  Students will need to be avid readers and strong in their analysis and written skills. This course would suit students who may be interested in future studies of sociology, criminology, psychology or business related areas among others.

Course Content: AS
  • Unit 1   Past to Present
  • Unit 2   Using Psychological Concepts

Course Content: A2
  • Unit 3    Implications in the Real World
  • Unit 4    Applied Research Methods
 
Assessment:         
Students follow a staged assessment route by taking the Advanced Subsidiary (AS) qualification in the first year. At this stage students write two external examinations (Unit 1 and Unit 2). Subject to satisfactory performance in the AS examinations, students pursue a further year`s study (A2) leading to a full A Level. At the end of the second year students write two external examinations (Unit 3 and Unit 4).

  • Unit 1: Written paper (1 hour and 30 mins)
  • Unit 2: Written paper (1 hour and 30 mins)
  • Unit 3: Written paper (2 hours and 30 mins)
  • Unit 4: Written paper (1 hour and 30 mins)

Spanish & French

Entry
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students should have at least a grade B in the relevant language at IGCSE.  Some students will be required to have a conversation in order to gauge oral skills in the language of choice. The Modern Foreign Languages assessment pathway differs from others subjects.  Grades achieved at AS level do not contribute to the final A2 grade at the end of year 13.  Students must complete all of 4 of the assessment components

Overview
These courses aim to further develop the four language skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) through the exploration of topics and issues pertaining to French speaking countries and Spanish speaking countries.  Additionally students will study Spanish/French literature to broaden their cultural awareness and to further enhance their language skills.

Students will study a wide variety of topics in the target language, such as human relationships, urban and rural life, the media, health and fitness, travel and tourism and the environment, to name a few. They will be expected to develop their knowledge of the cultures and societies in those countries where the language is spoken, and demonstrate understanding of the challenges these societies face.

Reading literature and newspapers is an essential part of understanding a culture and society, and the Modern Languages Department strongly encourages these as well as visits to the country of study.
Students must have a genuine interest in the subject and take every opportunity to develop cultural knowledge of the Spanish/French-speaking world.

Assessment:
  • Component 1: Oral examination and discussion
  • Component 2: Reading and Writing examination
  • Component 3: Topic based essay
  • Component 4: (A2 only) Texts – Writing exam based on the 3 literature books studied
  • AS assessment – Components 1-3
  • A2 assessment – Components 1-4

Sport & PE (WJEC)

Entry:
In order to be considered for entry to this course, students would benefit from previous experience at GCSE and from playing sport at a competitive level, however being good at both of these things is not enough to pass!  The course requires a lot of research, independent essay writing and reading. Final selection will be dependent upon interview.
 
Overview:
The sports and physical education course opens up the world of sports to everyone.  Students focus on one sporting activity of their choice, ranging from Basketball to Wakeboarding.  Whatever the sporting option, students learn to focus on the performance and development of their activity while learning the theories behind the development of sports.  Sports psychology and physiology as well as sport sociology feed into the theoretical component and prepare students for the challenges of coaching or officiating in their practical options. 
 
Assessment:
The AS level comprises two components: 
Component one consists of a Personal Performance Portfolio and Performance.  Students are also expected to coach or officiate a sporting/ fitness session. This component is worth 40% of the AS grade.
 
Component two is a written examination lasting 1 hour and 45 minutes and is made up of contextualised questions to include multiple choice, data response, short and extended answers. This component is worth 60% of the AS grade.Both these components make up 40% of the overall A level grade.
 
Opportunities:
The Sport and Physical Education course is a great pathway into a variety of careers including physiotherapy, business, psychology, marketing and media.


Law (CIE)

Entry
In order to be considered for entry to this course students should have at least 7 passes at GCSE or CXC, including a grade B in English or a 2 at CXC.

Overview
While Law at AS and A2 is not a requirement to advance to Law at University, it offers students an introduction to the complex and intriguing world of British Law.  The lessons take place outside of the regular school hours. It is offered by Walkers law firm and is taught by professionals from the Cayman Islands Law School.
 
The main aim of the course is to provide grounding in the main principles of the law prevailing in England and Wales. It will enable candidates to develop knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the structure, personnel and operation of the English Legal System and of two areas of substantive law as well as encouraging them to develop skills of analysis and problem solving through the application of legal rules.
 
The course covers four main areas:
  • The Structure and Operation of the English Legal System
  • The English Legal System
  • Law of Contract
  • Law of Tort
 
In Year 12 the AS course is examined by two papers both based on the “Structure and Operation of the English Legal System”. Both papers are 1 hour 30 minutes long with paper 1 being essay based and paper 2 being a data response.
 
In Year 13 the A2 course is examined by a further two papers. Both are 1 hour 30 minutes and are based around essay and scenario based problem questions. Paper 3 covers the Law of Contract and paper 4 covers the Law of Tort.


Extended Project Qualification

The Extended Project Qualification is a stand-alone AS level qualification that is equivalent to half of an A2 qualification, worth up to 70 UCAS tariff points.  Candidates can choose to do one of two options:
a)      5000 word essay on a topic of their choice
b)      Create an artefact, performance, display, or product alongside a 2000 word accompanying essay.

Both of these are highly demanding and require maturity and independence on the part of the candidate.  Students work with a supervisor and meet regularly to plan and evaluate their progress.  It is expected that students will manage their time effectively and meet all of their planned targets and deadlines.  Once the EPQ is complete all candidates must make a 15 minute presentation to a group, where they present their project and the process they have gone through in order to complete it. 

This is a challenging qualification that is highly regarded by Universities.  It provides students with opportunities to reflect on their learning and improvement in their academic studies.